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Blamire Young

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Blamire Young (1862-1935) was an Australian/English watercolorist at the turn of the 20th century. He specialized in landscapes and was a poster designer and an illustrator. He was known as one of the most prevalent watercolorists in Australia during his lifetime. Young spent his youth in England before moving to Sydney, Australia, in 1884. His recognition wouldn’t happen until around 1910, but in the years before, he traveled to and from England. He also received instruction from the painter Hubert von Herkomer during one of his stays in the British Isles. What propelled Young’s career was his participation in several exhibitions. His art gained renown all over the world in such places as Paris and Chicago. In England, he exhibited at The Royal Academy in London, The Royal Institute of painters in Watercolors, and the National Portrait Society. Apart from being a watercolorist, Young also specialized in poster design and book illustrations and was known for being a writer. One of his contributions to Australia was the creation of national stamps. The outcome was a red stamp with a kangaroo that became a national image, even after his death. One of his memorable publications was The Proverbs of Goya (1923). He was known for doing landscape paintings. Young was fascinated with history paintings and created a series based on colonialism in Australia called the Early Day Series. He believed in the possibilities of modern art and always remained skeptical of his more conservative fellow artists. Young spent his later years residing in Australia before dying in 1935. Blamire Young, (1862-1935), was an Australian-English watercolorist who specialized in landscape and designed one of the first Australian national stamps. Meta Description: Blamire Young, (1862-1935), was an Australian-English watercolorist who specialized in landscape and designed one of the first Australian national stamps.

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